THE Global Justice Movement Website

THE Global Justice Movement Website
This is the "Global Justice Movement" (dot org) we refer to in the title of this blog.

Friday, September 13, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 37


We are not entirely sure of which of the minor deities governs when Friday the thirteenth pops up, but it’s our own fault that it occasionally coincides with the weekly Friday news roundup.  As events demonstrate, however, there is no connection between bad luck and what day of the week or even number it is, since there seems to be a number of good things happening:

Thursday, September 12, 2019

“An Unbelievable Decision”


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the landmark case Scott v. Sandford (the notorious Dred Scott decision) resulted in a change in understanding the whole basis of the United States Constitution.  It was changed from a grant of rights from people to create the State, to a grant of rights from the State to create persons.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

A Few Thoughts on Solidarity


While researching an upcoming book on economic personalism we delved a little more deeply into the subject of solidarity than we had previously.  This is natural, for solidarity and personalism are inextricably linked with the social doctrine of Pope Pius XI on which the Just Third Way is, in part, based.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

“A Yoke Almost of Slavery”


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, Alexis de Tocqueville predicted in Democracy in America that the failure to resolve the issue of slavery and the treatment of Native Americans could undermine the foundations of American liberal democracy.  Nor were the popes unaware of the dangers of a “democracy” that permitted some people to be treated like things.

Monday, September 9, 2019

Norman Kurland on Russell Williams's "The Challenge"

In this 29-minute interview from December 12, 2016, Norman Kurland explains the Just Third Way, a new economic paradigm that arose largely from the ideas of Louis Kelso. Kurland explains to host Russell Williams how this justice-based approach could support democracy and help us address many of the problems facing communities, nations and the world.

Friday, September 6, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 36


What with Hurricane Dorian tearing up the Islands and the East Coast, and Keynesian economics tearing up the world economy, not to mention the economic antics of China that is increasingly relying on expanding its bubble economy at everyone else’s expense, it’s easy to overlook what else is going on:

Thursday, September 5, 2019

A CPA’s Perspective on Pope Francis


As a Certified Public Accountant, this writer has carried out audits on a number of organizations.  This is not a Bad Thing for the organization or institution being audited.  As we CPAs are aware, although people often express fear and even terror of an audit, our job is actually something similar to a medical checkup for an organization.  Yes, like physicians we can be called in when something is wrong, but it’s better to have regular checkups to see how you’re doing and see if there’s something you should be doing better or differently.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Democracy in America


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, for centuries a constant theme of reformers and philosophers was the importance of owning capital to be able to participate fully in society as a “political animal,” i.e., an individual with rights and a social nature.  The problem was that methods of finance virtually dictated that ownership of capital would be concentrated, unless a source of “free” capital became available — which in Europe was all-but impossible.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

The Modernist Monsignor


We closed the previous posting on this subject with the comment that “America’s Prince of Cranks” — Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (1831-1901) — had influenced the interpretation and understanding of Catholic social teaching, and thus the natural law “written in the hearts of all men.”  At first glance this seems rather odd, since Donnelly left the Catholic Church and took up spiritualism, was a socialist, influenced theosophy, and may have inspired certain features of Nazi racial ideology.

Monday, September 2, 2019

JTW Podcast: Message to the Hong Kong Dissidents


Purely by coincidence, CESJ recorded and scheduled a podcast addressed to the dissidents in Hong Kong the day before the latest phase of the crackdown by the authorities began.  Many people have been “detained” (a euphemism for arrested), and some may “disappear” as so many others have before.  There is, however, a solution that the powers-that-be might not be considering:

Friday, August 30, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 35


Immediately after news reports that the stock market was going to end the month of August by rising and recouping losses, it plunged.  As this is being written, however, it may turn around again.  In real news affecting real life:

Thursday, August 29, 2019

The Circle of Ownership


As we saw in theprevious posting on this subject, the idea that labor, whether by itself or “enhanced” by capital, is responsible for all production cause a few problems with consistency or even common sense.  A large measure of this is due to the fact that common sense and natural law both support the right of an owner to the fruits of ownership: income and control.  Capitalists and socialists both agree on that.  The only argument relates to what can legitimately be owned and what is productive — and that is a problem.

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

The Theory and Practice of Ownership


In 1931, the second year of the Great Depression and which saw the issuance of Quadragesimo Anno, a teenager by the name of Louis Orth Kelso (1913-1991) noticed something that belied the characterization of the United States as the Land of Opportunity.  Able-bodied men were hopping freight trains to somewhere, anywhere, they thought they might find work and not finding it.  By 1933, the official unemployment rate was 24.75%.

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Redefining Natural Law


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, we saw how socialists and modernists got right to work shifting the interpretation of social charity and social justice away from a natural law understanding, and to a less person-centered focus.  Among the foremost leaders of the reinterpretation movement, none was more effective than Monsignor John A. Ryan (1869-1945) of the Catholic University of America.

Monday, August 26, 2019

Another Louis Kelso Video

From the treasury of videos of the Harold Channer Show, we bring you another video of ESOP-inventor Louis O. Kelso.  Don't be turned off by the 45 seconds or so that it takes to get into the show.

Friday, August 23, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 34


We probably should report that the stock market is extremely volatile, going up and down apparently at random, but this is supposed to be a weekly news roundup, and stock market volatility hardly qualifies as news these days.  There are, however, actual important things going on:

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Death and Distribution, Part II


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, there are some things, such as redistribution, that are permitted in an emergency, but not as a usual thing.  Unfortunately, many people like to take the exception, and turn it into the rule.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

The Weird World of Ignatius Loyola Donnelly


He is almost unknown today except among a small group of in-the-know devotees, but at one time the populist politician, spiritualist, novelist, and amateur scientist Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (1831-1901), “the Sage of Nininger,” was someone to be reckoned with.  Among other things, he has been described as “America’s Prince of Cranks” and “the Apostle of Discontent.”  (Walter Monfried, “America’s ‘Prince of Cranks’,” The Milwaukee Journal, May 15, 1953, 8.)

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Death and Distribution, Part I


Many people today, regardless of their religious or philosophical persuasion, cannot tell the difference between a principle, especially an absolute principle, and the application of the principle.  For example, in the Catholic Church the former is doctrine and cannot be changed even to meet greatly changed conditions, while the latter is discipline and must be changed to meet changing conditions.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Louis Kelso on the Harold Channer Show

Starting in the early 19802, Harold Channer did a series of television shows with Louis O. Kelso.  Channer, who has one of the longest running public access television shows in the United States, has featured a number of innovative and pivotal figures whose significance the usual media outlets tend to ignore:

Friday, August 16, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 33


Things are starting to heat up . . . if by that you mean the thermometers.  Other than that, things are all over the map, as people try to maintain their discredited paradigms in the face of reality:

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Dorothy Day, Catholicism, and Communism, Part II


On Tuesday, in the previous posting on this subject, we noted that the Jesuit publication America had run “The Catholic Case for Communism,” an article by Dean Dettloff, their correspondent in Toronto, Ontario, which not very subtly turned Dorothy Day, the founder of the Catholic Worker Movement, into a shill for communism.

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Forty Years After


As we noted in the previous posting on this subject, both capitalists and socialists managed to reinterpret Pope Leo XIII’s encyclical Rerum Novarum to fit their particular paradigms.  The possibility that what Leo XIII was talking about was something entirely different does not appear to have occurred to many people.

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Dorothy Day, Catholicism, and Communism, Part I


America magazine, a publication of the Jesuits, a Catholic religious Order, recently — July 23, 2019 — published an article by Dean Dettloff, America’s Toronto, Ontario, correspondent and a junior member of the Institute for Christian Studies.  The article, “The Catholic Case for Communism,” is a graphic illustration of the problems associated with people projecting their own opinions on to individuals or groups they admire, whether the admired individuals or groups ever expressed sympathy with them, or even if they were opposed to them.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Louis Kelso, ESOP Association Address, 05/10/1984

Maybe the quality of the recording isn't all it should be, but here is an interesting recording may on May 10, 1984, a month after the founding of CESJ, at the annual ESOP Association Conference.  Kelso gave the keynote address:

Friday, August 9, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 32


We  do not have as many news items as we had last week, but they are at least as significant.  Rather than telling you about what we’re going to tell you about, we’ll just go straight to the news:

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Of Dissent and Distributism


In yesterday’s posting we saw that the “cause” for the canonization of G.K. Chesterton was given the thumbs down by Peter Doyle, Bishop of Northampton, and that this excited a somewhat negative reaction on the part of some Chestertonians, as followers of Chesterton are called.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Of Distributism and Dissent


For those of you who care (and we would be surprised if there were very many), the Chestertonian Community (i.e., fans of the English writer Gilbert Keith Chesterton, 1874-1936) sustained a shock on the order of 7.3 on the Richter Scale this past Friday.  It seems that His Excellency (or His Lordship; we aren’t up on the latest ecclesiastical lingo in the U.K.) Bishop Peter Doyle of Northampton in England, which was Chesterton’s home diocese, put the kibosh on Chesterton’s “cause” for canonization.

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Subsidiarity and Democracy in America


One of the more interesting things we discover about Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (1805-1859) and his greatest work, Democracy in America (1835, 1840), is that the author — like Orestes Augustus Brownson (1803-1876) a generation latter in The American Republic (1866) — considered himself a Catholic writing as a Catholic.  What surprises many people is to find out that both de Tocqueville and Brownson considered the American system (slavery excepted) to be the closest to “Catholic” political theory.

Monday, August 5, 2019

"A Piece of the Action"

For a while we've been featuring short videos of Mortimer Adler talking about philosophical topics that have a bearing on the Just Third Way.  Today for a change of pace we thought we'd present a short video about someone else who has made a significant contribution to the Just Third Way, in fact, can be considered one of the founders of it: Louis O. Kelso!

Friday, August 2, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 31


An interesting batch of news items this week, most of them coming out in this morning’s Wall Street Journal — and most of them having to do with efforts to solve problems using the same paradigm that caused the problems in the first place!  Why not just take the easy way out and go with the Just Third Way?  After all, it might actually solve a few problems instead of creating more:

Thursday, August 1, 2019

The Ultimate Social Power


In the previous posting on this subject, we looked at the essence of subsidiarity, that is, where power in society subsists in a properly structured social order.  Within the context of “Thomist personalism” and the Aristotelian-Thomist concept of natural law we found that all power properly resides in the human person, not in any form of society.  As Pope Pius XI noted in his social analysis, “Only man, the human person, and not society in any form is endowed with reason and a morally free will” (Divini Redemptoris, § 29), and thus even a human person in an official capacity has only such rights as are delegated from people.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Restructuring the Social Order


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, Pope Benedict XV was not able to make any significant progress against the advance of the new things of socialism, modernism, and the New Age first because of World War I, and then his premature death in the flu pandemic following the war.  It was left to his successor, Pope Pius XI, to carry on the struggle.

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Subsidiarity and Personalism


In the form of liberal democracy — the “American” kind that puts sovereignty in the human person as the highest temporal expression of human dignity, not into government (local or otherwise) or into an élite — the concept of subsidiarity has been around since Adam.  It is an application of the natural right of liberty (free association or contract) which necessarily implies that control over someone’s life is vested in the person whose life it is.

Monday, July 29, 2019

Gene Gordon on Deck!

In this week's Just Third Way podcast, Dave Hamill interviews Gene Gordon of Descendants of American Slaves for Economic and Social Justice.  Gene talks about how true reparations will repair the economic system to empower all through real justice — and he's not talking about handing out other people's money, either:

Friday, July 26, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 30


Usually when the temperature goes way up, activity goes way down, but the advancement of the Just Third Way seems to be heating up along with the temperature (although we hope there is no correlation, or we’d know what to do about global warming!).  So while we’re waiting for things to cool down and get even hotter (in a good way), here’s what’s been happening in the Just Third Way network:

Thursday, July 25, 2019

An Understanding of Subsidiarity


In the previous posting on this subject, we looked at one idea of subsidiarity, that some level of government does whatever an individual or a group is unable to do for itself.  That understanding of subsidiarity, however, completely ignores the act of social justice, which is concerned with removing barriers to full participation in the institutions of the common good.  Social justice is not a substitute for individual justice or charity.  Rather, social justice enables individual justice and charity to function.

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Putting On That Socialist Spin


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, although Pope Leo XIII’s 1891 encyclical Rerum Novarum, “On Capital and Labor,” was meant to provide an alternative to socialism and modernism, adherents of the new things of modernism, socialism, and the New Age were quick to seize on it and divert it to their own purposes.  Among the first to do so were the agrarian socialist Henry George and his friend, the excommunicated priest Father Edward McGlynn.

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Introduction to Subsidiarity


In preparation for a discussion on the natural law principles underlying religious social teaching (as opposed to religious faith-based teaching), we’ve been re-reading Mortimer Adler’s 1990 book, Truth in Religion: The Plurality of Religions and the Unity of Truth (New York: Scribner and Sons).  As Adler argued, there are certain philosophical and natural law principles that are common to almost all religions, and are true, regardless of the truth of a religion’s purely faith-based teachings.

Monday, July 22, 2019

Something Completely Different?

 We've been alternating CESJ's Just Third Way podcast with videos featuring Mortimer J. Adler, who co-authored with Louis Kelso two key books that relate to economic personalism, The Capitalist Manifesto (1958) and The New Capitalists (1961), the latter with the significant subtitle, "A Proposal to Free Economic Growth from the Slavery of Savings."  That does not mean, of course, that new capital can be financed without savings, but that human beings should not be enslaved to money and credit, which are, ultimately, only tools that people should be using, not money and credit using people.

Friday, July 19, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 29


Have you seen the “People and Things” video?  If not, why not?  And if you have, why not view it again?  And spread it around to your network?  It’s less than two minutes, and perfect for the short attention span generation.  And as for what else the Just Third Way network is doing:

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Taxation and Modern Monetary Theory


As they say, even a broken clock is right twice a day, the implication being that not even something inherently wrong is always wrong in its conclusions.  That is something capitalists and socialists — and MMT theorists — would do well to remember.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Old Things But in a New Way


In 1891, with the release of Rerum Novarum, Leo XIII’s encyclical “On Capital and Labor,” the careers of the agrarian socialist Henry George and his associate, Father Edward McGlynn were given the opportunity of a lifetime.  If handled right, it could give George’s career a much-needed shot in the arm by handing him something he could twist into a personal attack.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Faith v. Reason?


Given the rather startling popularity of yesterday’s posting of Mortimer Adler’s appearance on Firing Line and his grilling by William F. Buckley, we decided today to answer the question that Buckley asked Adler, but which Adler was not able to answer completely.  This was not because Adler could not answer, but because Buckley tried to get Adler to say what he, Buckley, wanted Adler to say, rather than what Adler needed to say.

Monday, July 15, 2019

Mortimer Adler on Religious Truth

Yes, we know that this is supposed to be the Just Third Way podcast and not the WJTW Adler Video Extravaganza, but these little gems from someone who has a claim to being the most prominent American Aristotelian-Thomist of the twentieth century have proven so popular that we can't resist the urge to keep posting them:

Friday, July 12, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 28


Although there are more spectacular problems in the world, one of the more fundamental ones is the question of how people without capital ownership can become capital owners without harming anyone else.  As regular readers of this blog are aware, this can not only be done without harm, but in a way that benefits everyone by reforming the monetary, tax, and ownership structures in society.  So today we present a few thoughts on the subject:

Thursday, July 11, 2019

When Did Notre Dame Become Notre Dumb?


As a few of you may know (and even fewer care), I attended the University of Notre Dame du Lac in northern Indiana in the late 1970s.  I was in the Notre Dame Glee Club for four years under Dr. David Clark (“Coach”) Isele, majored in Accounting, and managed to graduate, going on to get my MBA at the University of Evansville, Indiana.  Eventually I became Director of Research for the interfaith Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ) in Arlington, Virginia.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Countering Socialism


In the previous posting on this subject, we learned that, while Pope Leo XIII started off his pontificate by continuing the condemnation of the “new things” of socialism, modernism, and “New Age” thought, people just weren’t “getting it.”  Despite the work of Msgr. Aloysius Taparelli, S.J. in developing a philosophically sound principle of social justice, the socialists had seized on the term and made it their own by giving it a definition that conformed to socialism instead of to natural law.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

John Henry Newman and His Brothers

Word has just come down the pike that the canonization of John Henry Newman has been set for October 13, 2019.  We say that with caution, because you can bet money on it that most of the people commenting on it, Catholic or non, will say that “Newman will be made a saint,” or words to that effect.

Monday, July 8, 2019

More from Mortimer!


We’ve been having such success with the short videos of Mortimer Adler we’ve been putting up that we decided to do a couple more this week.  The two together are not more than fifteen minutes, but they have substance.  The first one is Adler talking about the Great Ideas for about ten minutes.  The second one is a brief four minutes or so on how you don’t really get an education in school, but from a lifetime of learning:

Friday, July 5, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 27


As you can see from the volume of news items this week, the Just Third Way is in no danger of a summer slowdown.  Of course, we don’t want you to slow down, either, so be sure to pass this edition of News from the Network along to your network:

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Divine Right of Kings v. Democracy


In celebration of Independence Day here in the United States, we decided to take a look at where the Founding Fathers got some of their ideas.  While the specific notions of democracy that inspired American liberal democracy go back to ancient Greece and Rome, their more immediate source of inspiration was the reaction against the “divine right” theory of Sir Robert Filmer (cir. 1588-1653), chief theologian of James VI/I (1566-1625) of Scotland/England.

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

An Unexpected Renaissance


In the previous posting on this subject, we saw to what extent “the New Christianity” had infiltrated the mainstream Christian denominations, especially the Catholic Church.  Pope Pius IX called the First Vatican Council in part to deal with the problem, and two key doctrines were defined as part of the effort.  These were papal infallibility to rein in the exaggerated claims being made for papal authority by fideists, Neo-Catholics, and reactionaries, and the primacy of the Intellect to put faith on a solid foundation consistent with reason.

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

The Four Faces of Socialism: The Abolition of Private Ownership


As we saw in the first posting on this subject, there are four primary aspects of socialism.  These are philanthropy, communitarianism, reform or abolition of religion, and — our topic for today — the abolition of private ownership.  Again, it is important to note that a particular form of socialism may not include all or even any of these aspects, and yet still be true socialism.

Monday, July 1, 2019

Mortimer Adler, Intellect Mind Over Matter, I & II

Much to our surprise, the videos we've been putting up about Mortimer Adler, philosophy, and some rather difficult or esoteric concepts have been proving very popular.  The recent one on the essence of socialism discussing the distinction between form and substance ranked in the top five all time hits for this blog!  This astounded certain commentators who think you have to dumb everything down and then not talk about it at all in order to be popular.  It turns out talking about truth and all that actually draws a crowd . . . and only a few of them are hecklers!

Friday, June 28, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 26


Along with visits to this blog increasing dramatically over the past two weeks, there are some real news items that should be of interest to readers (other than the good news that, if you’re reading this, you are not alone).  It seems that people around the world are becoming increasingly aware that something may be wrong, and the usual solutions have been proven to be inadequate:

Thursday, June 27, 2019

The Four Faces of Socialism: The Democratic Religion


As we saw in the first posting on this subject, and (purely by coincidence) in Wednesday’s posting, there are four primary aspects of socialism: philanthropy, communitarianism, reform or abolition of religion, and abolition of private ownership.  Again, it is important to note that a particular form of socialism may not include all or even any of these aspects, and yet still be true socialism.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

The New Christianity

As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, following the Financial, Industrial, and French Revolutions, society was in chaos and people began searching for alternatives to traditional political, domestic, and religious institutions.  What they came up with was “the democratic religion” — socialism.

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

The Four Faces of Socialism: Communitarianism


As we saw in the first posting on this subject, there are four primary aspects of socialism: philanthropy, communitarianism, reform or abolition of religion, and abolition of private ownership.  We noted that a particular form of socialism may not include all or even any of these aspects, and yet still be true socialism.

Monday, June 24, 2019

The Ownership Vehicle Podcast!

In this week’s Just Third Way podcast, Dr. Norman Kurland, President of CESJ, takes a look at the three main ownership vehicles of the Just Third Way.  These are Capital Homesteading Accounts, Citizens Land Development Cooperatives, and the one in current law that embodies the basic concept on which the others are based, the Leveraged “JBM S-Corp ESOP”:

Friday, June 21, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 25


Another week with a plethora of items indicating that something is wrong with the world, somewhere and somehow, but nobody seems able to pinpoint what or how to solve it, at least not without the Just Third Way, which doesn’t seem to fit into most people’s paradigms.  From “the JTW Perspective,” however, what to do about these situations becomes obvious:

Thursday, June 20, 2019

The Four Faces of Socialism: Philanthropy


In the previous posting on this subject, we noted that there are four primary aspects of socialism: philanthropy, communitarianism, reform or abolition of religion, and abolition of private ownership.  We also noted that a particular form of socialism may not include all or even any of these aspects, and yet still be true socialism.  As Pope Pius XI noted,

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Christianity and Democracy


On Christmas Day in the year 1797 the aristocratic Luigi Barnabà Chiaramonte (1742-1823), Cardinal Bishop of Imola in Romagna in northern Italy, startled his congregation by declaring that there is no essential conflict between democracy and Christianity.  Coming as it did hard on the heels of the Reign of Terror in Revolutionary France (1793-1794), it must have seemed to many that their Ordinary had lost his mind. (E.E.Y. Hales, Pio Nono: A Study in European Politics and Religion in the Nineteenth Century.  New York: P.J. Kenedy & Sons, 1954, 35.)

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

The Four Faces of Socialism: The Essence of Socialism


No, this is not a discussion on the various types of socialism, such as Marxist, Georgist, Relgious, or Democratic (especially since there are many more than that), but on four key aspects of socialist thought itself.  We will have to look briefly at a couple of the different forms of socialism, but that is not the main point here.

Monday, June 17, 2019

Mortimer Adler on Speaking and Listening


Last week’s video of Mortimer Adler speaking on happiness made so many people happy that we thought we’d bring you another one by Adler to listen to . . . about how to listen!

Friday, June 14, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 24


It’s astonishing the frequency with which events and situations come to light that could be resolved very simply (although not always easily) by applying the Just Third Way.  Take for instance:

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Can Social Justice Be Defined?


As we have stated more than once on this blog, we like to get questions or criticisms . . . questions or criticisms that we can answer, that is.  Okay, polite questions or criticisms that we can answer. . . . like this one, from someone we had sent some links to recent blog postings:

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: The Idea of Distributism


In the previous posting on this subject, we closed by noting that a realistic vision of a just society should present a viable alternative to capitalism, characterized by concentration of capital ownership in the hands of a relatively small private sector élite, and socialism, characterized by concentration of capital ownership in the hands of a public bureaucracy.  Distributism, a policy of widely distributed private property with a preference for small, family owned farms and artisan businesses, appeared to be one possibility.

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Why is Socialism Wrong?


Many people these days assume that if they can find a precedent or some statement that they can twist into meaning what they want or need it to mean, that they have discovered a new right or truth, conveyed to them by whatever they worship as God and to be understood in the light of faith alone.  Such people forget (if they ever knew) that truth is objective reality.  Their own perceptions and beliefs are, on the other hand, subjective.  As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, nowhere has this tendency been more evident than in the ongoing effort to reformulate or repurpose Christianity as a form of socialism.

Monday, June 10, 2019

Mortimer Adler on Happiness

Today we take a look at Mortimer J. Adler's take on the question of happiness.  Adler, who co-authored The Capitalist Manifesto (1958) and The New Capitalists (1961) with Louis O. Kelso, is considere4d by many to be the premier American Aristotelian of the twentieth century.  In this half-hour video clip, we take a look at Adler's take on what Aristotle meant by "happiness," which seems to be a concept that is greatly misunderstood these days:

Friday, June 7, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 23


There have been a number of interesting developments this past week relating both to the development of the concept of social justice and to its application to address some current situations:

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Rebranding Socialism as True Christianity


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, Robert Owen believed that all of humanity’s problems would disappear if religion, marriage, and private property were abolished.  In 1813 in A New View of Society he declared that reorienting religion from worshiping God to bettering the condition of humanity would be sufficient to establish and maintain the perfect world.

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: The Modernist World


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, George Bernard Shaw was as insistent that socialism is the universal panacea for all problems (as long as you don’t eat meat or drink alcohol) and that distributism is just another name for Fabian socialism* as G.K. Chesterton was adamant that Shaw was full of . . . nonsense.

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Religion Without God


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, Robert Owen, the Father of Modern Socialism (and Communism) wanted to establish and maintain a perfect society in this life, a constant theme of socialism for the past two centuries and more.  Since he believed that people are formed entirely by their environment, all that is necessary to create the perfect society (so he claimed) is to abolish religion, marriage, and private property.  Everything will then be perfect.

Monday, June 3, 2019

Interview with Joe Recinos, Part II (and I)


This week we bring you the second part of an interview with Joseph W. Recinos, the Latin America Director of the Center for Economic and Social Justice.  Just so you don’t have to search out the first half, we’ve included that, also.

Friday, May 31, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 22


Not as many news items as last week, but there are still significant events going on, especially as the powers-that-be insist on ignoring the Just Third Way:

Thursday, May 30, 2019

A New View of Society


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, modern socialism (which includes Marxist communism) traces its roots to the thought of Robert Owen.  Owen’s theories anticipated the modern Welfare State as well as the drift into secularism, the deification of the abstraction of humanity, the decay of marriage and family, and a host of other ills attendant upon the alienation of most people from direct ownership of the means of production, and thus personal power and the means of participating as full members of society.

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: The Last Debate


In our previous posting on this subject, we completed a brief overview of the lost debate between G.K. Chesterton and G.B Shaw.  Today we begin an equally brief summary of the last debate between the two “metaphysical jesters,” as one commentator termed them.  (William B. Furlong, GBS/GKC, Shaw and Chesterton: The Metaphysical Jesters.  University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1970.)  And so our story begins. . . .

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Brothers Under the Skin


On Sunday, July 14, 1833 at Oxford University in England, the Reverend John Keble (1792-1866) ascended the University Pulpit and preached his scheduled “Assize Sermon.”  An “Assize Sermon” is preached in the Church of England at the opening of a term of the civil and criminal courts — “the Assizes” — hence the name.  The sermon is officially addressed to the judges and officers of the court and is intended to exhort them to do their duty and render justice.

Monday, May 27, 2019

Interview with Joe Recinos, Part I


This week we bring you the first part of an interview with Joseph W. Recinos, the Latin America Director of the Center for Economic and Social Justice.  Joe, a development economist, is a volunteer, and a co-founder of CESJ.

Friday, May 24, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 21


A lot has been going on this week, not the least of which is the annual conference of the ESOP Association in Washington, DC (which we may report on next week, as it is still in progress).  The bottom line?  Let’s cut to the chase and get to the news items:

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: “A Reply to Mr. Mallock”


In the previous posting on this subject we saw how early in their relationship, George Bernard Shaw had used unfair debating tricks (are there fair debating tricks?) to “win” an argument against Chesterton by deliberately changing the real point under discussion.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Austrians and Distributists


Every once in a while we get a question that we answer and then realize we’ve written a blog posting.  On Friday of last week we had such a happy occurrence.  As someone asked in a forum discussing “Thomist Philosophy,” that is, the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas,

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: How to Argue With a Socialist


In the previous posting on this subject, we left G.K. Chesterton smiling benignly down on an infuriated George Bernard Shaw.  Clearly Chesterton knew exactly what buttons to push to bring Shaw to a rapid boil in the shortest period of time.  The fact was that Chesterton had figured out how to handle an argument with Shaw: refuse to argue except on principle.

Monday, May 20, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast: Norman Kurland on Power

Power is a dirty word to many people today, but that's probably because most people don't have any.  As a result, they tend to define the concept in terms of power over others, rather than the idea of having power over one's own life.  That is odd, because power is defined as "ability for doing."  Unless one plans on being a pair of ragged claws at the bottom of the sea (or whatever it was that J. Alfred Prufrock thought about), power is essential simply to exist.  That is why Dr. Norman Kurland, President of the Center for Economic and Social Justice, decided to talk about power and how to structure it for the benefit of everyone, not just a few:

Friday, May 17, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 20

Things are a little quiet due to the fact that expanded ownership initiatives are waiting to see what comes out of the ESOP Association conference next week, but some ongoing projects are making progress, and of course there are more personal matters:

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Chesterton and Shaw: The Lost Debate


Sometime during the evening of a long day late in the summer of 1923, George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), renowned wit and agent provocateur for Fabian socialism, had almost finished entertaining himself and other members of a party assembled at a house in Chelsea.  Having been there for about an hour, Shaw was preparing to take his leave when the arrival of Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was announced.

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Aquinas on Private Property


In the previous posting on this subject — private property in general, and under what circumstances (if any) private property ceases to exist — we examined the arguments Msgr. John A. Ryan of the Catholic University of America used to justify substituting the definitions of social justice and distributive justice used by the socialists and modernists of the 1830s and 1840s for those of the Catholic Church derived from Aristotelian-Thomist philosophy.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

More Waugh on Vatican II


No, that’s not a cute way of saying we’re waling on the Second Vatican Council, which would be inappropriate for an interfaith group in any event.  It’s a way of continuing our piece on Evelyn Waugh and his take on the Council, which is somewhat different from what may have been recorded.

Monday, May 13, 2019

Just Third Way (Re)Podcast, No. 48


This week we have a special treat in store on the Just Third Way podcast: the first part of an interview with renowned binary economist and author Dr. Robert H.A. Ashford.  Dr. Ashford teaches law and binary economics at the University of Syracuse law school, and is the co-author of Binary Economics: The New Paradigm (Lanham, Maryland: The University Press of America, 1999):

Friday, May 10, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 19


Although we do know from the number of people viewing the blog and other indicators that word of the Just Third Way is getting around, it seems as though it ought to be faster.  Nevertheless, each day a little progress is being made, but not in a way that generates news items, unfortunately:

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Evelyn Waugh on Vatican II


In the eyes of some, the Catholic Church prior to the Second Vatican Council was a cesspool of corrupt authoritarianism and abuse that insulted human dignity at the most fundamental level.  To take only one example, Monsignor George A. Kelly (1916-2004) quoted Malachi Brendan Martin (1921-1999) in his (Kelly’s) book, The Battle for the American Church (1979), giving a lengthy list of things in the Church that “do not work,” especially anything that made the Church Catholic or even religious. (Msgr. George A. Kelly, The Battle for the American Church. New York: Doubleday and Company, Inc., 1979, 5-6.)

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

"America's Greatest Social Philosopher"


On his death in 1985, Father William J. Ferree, S.M., Ph.D. was eulogized as “the second founder” of his religious order, the Society of Mary.  Father Andrew F. Morlion, O.P., Ph.D., Belgian philosopher and founder and first president of the International University of Social Studies in Rome, referred to Father Ferree as “America’s greatest social philosopher.”  But who was he?

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

A Study in Contradiction


One of the things we find most consistent about socialism is its inconsistency, the ability to say one thing and do another with astonishing regularity.  This was brought forcibly home to us when we came across the writings of Robert Owen, considered the first of the British line of socialism.

Monday, May 6, 2019

Adler on the Air

DANGER, WILL ROBINSON!

WE HAVE DELETED THE PODCAST TO EDIT FURTHER.  IT WILL BE UP AGAIN AS SOON AS WE ARE FINISHED.  IN THE MEANTIME, WE PUT UP A LINK TO WALLACE'S 1959 INTERVIEW WITH ADLER
For the Just Third Way Podcast this week, we have a special treat in store: Mike Wallace’s interview of Mortimer Adler.  Adler, of course, co-authored The Capitalist Manifesto (1958) and The New Capitalists (1961) with Louis O. Kelso, but is also noted for the Great Books program and as the editor of the Syntopicon:

Friday, May 3, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 18


Back in the early nineteenth century, the proto-socialist and founder of “the New Christianity” Claude Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-Simon (1760-1825), tried to commit suicide by shooting himself in the head.  He missed, but his followers claimed that the shock brought about his realization that he was either God’s Special Messenger or possibly even God.  Ever since, failure has been taken as proving that socialism actually works.  It only fails because people can’t seem to deal with a system that relies on them becoming God.  We, of course, just assume that people are going to keep on being people, so the Just Third Way is based on working with human nature rather than trying to change it:

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Money Isn’t Everything


It’s time for another esoteric blog posting on the nature of money.  Today we’ll be looking at the difference between what is called “the Currency School” that virtually all modern economics, whether or not mainstream, accept, and “the Banking School,” on which binary economics is based.

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The Four Pillars of Socialism


We’ve been doing a great deal of research for a series of books a publisher (obviously intelligent and astute) has requested that we submit “on spec” — i.e., they’d like to see a manuscript, but aren’t making any specific promises about acceptance.  Much of this has involved investigation into the roots of the “New Things,” as Pope Leo XIII referred to them in his landmark 1891 encyclical “On Capital and Labor” (the current official title).

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Poverty v. Destitution


In his 2015 book, God or Nothing, Robert Cardinal Sarah made an interesting distinction between poverty and destitution.  We’re not sure we agree, but it may be something to think about.  According to Sarah, most people through history have been “poor,” which he defined as producing enough to provide decently for one’s self and one’s dependents, but nothing more.

Monday, April 29, 2019

People and Things


This week’s podcast features a repeat of the discussion about CESJ’s short (one minute and forty-seven seconds) introductory video, “People and Things.”  The reason for rerunning it so soon after the original broadcast is that on Saturday, April 27, 2019, CESJ had its first “Justice University” seminar as part of CESJ’s thirty-fifth anniversary celebration.  The seminar was well-attended, and the following workshop had a great deal of lively discussion, so we thought we’d let others join in the fun, if a trifle late and a little vicariously:

Friday, April 26, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 17


After many trials and tribulations of a computerized nature, here are this week’s news items:

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Creating Truth for Fun and Prophet


In the previous posting on this subject, we noted that Monsignor John A. Ryan (1869-1945) had his thought formed in an environment that accepted “the democratic religion” of socialism as a given.  The idea was to reduce Christianity to its essential elements, of which the first and overriding principle is that material wellbeing of everyone, especially the poor, is the goal of existence.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Interfaith Dialogue


Although differences and disagreements between people of different faiths and philosophies are nothing particularly new, they seem to be achieving much greater depths of depravity than ever before.  True, this might be merely the fact that with modern communications and the growing hunger of the popular media for sensation and scandal to titillate and entertain people who should have much better things to do, what was under the radar in former days is now the stuff of everyday life.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

The Age of Aquarius


In the previous posting on this subject we examined the source of Monsignor John A. Ryan’s understanding of social justice and distributive justice as embodied in the two books that made him famous, A Living Wage (1906) and Distributive Justice (1916).  As we discovered, Ryan’s definitions did not come from a study of Rerum Novarum, but from the utopian and religious socialist movements of the early nineteenth century that Rerum Novarum was intended to counter.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Easter Witness and a Proposal for Ireland


This week’s podcast features a panel discussion about the Easter Rising historical event in Ireland and a proposal for Ireland outlined in Easter Witness, book by Michael D. Greaney.  (BTW, Dave looked in the wrong place on Amazon; the price is $20, not $500 for an autographed presentation copy!)  The discussion relates how the ownership of Ireland mentioned in the Proclamation issued during that Easter event can be the key for economic transformation of Ireland and the world.

Friday, April 19, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 16


Maybe it’s the season, but the criticisms of the Just Third Way have been particularly weak lately, with critics repeating themselves more than usual and saying things that have been refuted repeatedly.  On the other hand, it might be that the ideas are starting to get into the right quarters and people are starting to pay attention.  You decide:

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Things Are Seldom What They Seem


In the opening of Act II of Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore, Little Buttercup informs the Captain in cryptic terms that many things are not as they might appear at first glance.  Confused, the Captain responds in kind, trading a list of random aphorisms for Buttercup’s “incomprehensible utterances.”

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

A Little Background Information


In the previous posting on this subject we looked at a statement made by Pope Francis to the effect that “food is not private property,” which a number of people declared meant that His Holiness had abolished private property in food, and that therefore socialism is a true interpretation of Catholic social teaching.

Monday, April 15, 2019

CESJ Repodcast


In this week’s Just Third Way (re)podcast, host Dave Hamill finishes the discussion on the Core Values of the interfaith Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ).  Successful organizations start with people firmly committed to a set of core values, which cannot be compromised without weakening the organization.  CESJ’s strength, unity and programs flow from its founding principles, agreed upon by consensus from the first meeting on April 7, 1984. CESJ’s core values were developed to guide CESJ in its work, to attract others sharing these values and to serve as the very basis of CESJ’s existence.

Friday, April 12, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 15


Apparently at least one person on Earth is offended by the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, specifically Article 17: “(1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others. (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.”  We suspect that some offended people don’t know what property is, may not be too clear on the fact that “everyone” includes “everyone,” or maybe just got up on the wrong side of the bed this century.  In any event, here are a few tidbits of news from around the network:

Thursday, April 11, 2019

How Finance Really Works in Practice


In the previous posting on this subject, we looked at the different ways in which new capital formation could be financed.  We discovered that if we assume that only existing savings can be used to purchase new capital, ownership of all new capital is going to be concentrated in the hands of whoever owns those savings.  In capitalism, that means a private sector élite, while in socialism that means a government bureaucracy of some sort, whether you’re talking a national dictator or a village council.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

And Now for Something Completely Different

. . . but not entirely.  Back in the early twentieth century, Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson made a name for himself writing historical novels and then satire to try and counter the "New Things" of socialism, modernism, and the New Age . . . which (much to his chagrin) was taken as “prophecy” (Lord of the World, 1907) or his blueprint for an ideal society (The Dawn of All, 1911).  He also wrote others in what he termed the “sensational” category, which his readers seemed intent on misinterpreting.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

How Finance Really Works in Theory


In the previous posting on this subject, we looked at why Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) is illogical.  Specifically, it relies on a mathematical impossibility, i.e., having one equation with three dependent variables.  The bottom line is that in the Quantity Theory of Money equation, M x V = P x Q, V, P, and Q determine M, not the other way around as MMT adherents maintain.  If you manipulate M, all you do is screw up the system so that Say’s Law of Markets won’t function.

Monday, April 8, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast Greatest Hits!

In this week’s Just Third Way podcast, host Dave Hamill leads a discussion on some of the Core Values of the interfaith Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ).  Successful organizations start with people firmly committed to a set of core values, which cannot be compromised without weakening the organization.  CESJ’s strength, unity and programs flow from its founding principles, agreed upon by consensus from the first meeting on April 7, 1984. CESJ’s core values were developed to guide CESJ in its work, to attract others sharing these values and to serve as the very basis of CESJ’s existence.

Friday, April 5, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 14


As usual, there have been some interesting developments in the Just Third Way this week, some of them even for the better.  So, not to waste any time:

Thursday, April 4, 2019

A Contradiction in Terms?


Recently we received a quote from a news commentary on an allocution by Pope Francis to the effect that the head of the Catholic Church had abolished the natural law.  Not all of the natural law, of course, just the part that some people disagreed with and needed some credible authority to back them up regarding the alleged abolition of private property by Pope Francis (or any other pope).  Specifically,

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

“But You Are a Slave”


In his Advice to Young Men, the English Radical politician and journalist (among other things) William Cobbett said, “To be poor and independent is very nearly an impossibility.”  As the “Apostle of Distributism” (as G.K. Chesterton called him), Cobbett had even stronger things to say about the necessity of widespread capital ownership:

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Some Thoughts on Distributism


We recently got into a FaceBook group devoted to discussing “Catholic Stuff.”  Most of the questions and discussion items were a little bit out of our area of expertise, but we did get into an interesting one about “distributism,” the rather loosely defined social philosophy advocated by G.K. Chesterton and his cohort, Hilaire Belloc.

Monday, April 1, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast: “People and Things”


This week’s guest on the Just Third Way podcast is Dawn Brohawn.  Dawn is Director of Communications for the Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ), and recently completed a short pilot video intended to introduce people to the ideas behind the Just Third Way.  Join Dave and Dawn as they discuss the video, then read the supplementary material and view the video:

Friday, March 29, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 13


This past week seems to have been a “Justice University” week.  A number of projects relating to that endeavor have been advanced materially, and relationships are being built.  We’re also seeing increasing evidence that the world needs the Just Third Way, and for many reasons:

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Why Modern Monetary Theory is Illogical


“Modern Monetary Theory” or “MMT” is the theoretical framework for virtually all monetary policy in the world today.  Even those who reject MMT do so within the context of the very system they reject.

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Freedom Under God


It is probably safe to say that at no time in living memory has there been less true human freedom. Even the idea of freedom has decayed to the point where it is effectively meaningless for most people.

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

The Four Pillars of a Just Market Economy


In the previous posting on this subject, we looked at the principles of economic justice, 1) Participation, 2) Distribution, and 3) Social Justice.  These, we believe, are the essential building blocks of an economically just society.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Just Third Way Special Video Broadcasts


For this week’s “Electronic Outreach,” we thought we’d try something different.  Last week we launched a new video, “People and Things,” a two-minute production that “baits the hook” so to speak and gets people interested in learning more about the Just Third Way.  We realized we had a number of short videos, none of them longer than a few minutes, that people weren’t seeing only because they didn't know about them.    So, staring off with the new video, here’s a convenient “play list” for those of you who like your edutainment in small pieces:

Friday, March 22, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 12


There has been a great deal of progress made this past week in advancing our understanding of how the Just Third Way can help get the world out of the situation it is in and that offers a viable alternative to bankrupt (and bankrupting) Keynesian theories that have resulted in mountains of unserviceable debt in virtually every country in the world.  One message of the Just Third Way that today’s politicians need to take to heart is that it doesn’t have to be this way:

Thursday, March 21, 2019

The Three Principles of Economic Justice


In the previous posting on this subject we noted that, having defined the State’s role in the economy in rather broad terms, we still needed to come up with the principles that should guide all  participants in the market if we want to have a justly structured economic order.  One thing to keep in mind, of course, is that (as Daniel Webster said) “Power naturally and necessarily follows property.”  If we want common human dignity respected, we cannot vest controlling power — property — in the State or anywhere other than every child, woman, and man.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

“A New Conception of Society and of the State”


In 1825 a small book was published that was to have enormous consequences.  The book was Le Nouveau Christianisme, “The New Christianity,” the posthumous work of Claude Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-Simon (1760-1825).

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

What Does “Democracy” Mean?


In the previous posting on this subject we looked at the necessity for any type of organized human activity to have clear and understandable rules in order to be just or even functional.  There must, in fact, be a recognition and implementation of the democratic ideal.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast No. 50


Recently Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said “We should be excited about automation, because what it could potentially mean is more time educating ourselves, more time creating art, more time investing in and investigating the sciences, more time focused on invention, more time going to space, more time enjoying the world that we live in, because not all creativity needs to be bonded by wage.”

Friday, March 15, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 11


Somehow, today shaped up to be “Fabian Friday.”  It wasn’t planned, it just turned out that way.  It is astonishing, though, how often we find news articles from Days Gone By that contradict “what everybody knows,” e.g., the claim that Father Edward McGlynn, who advocated socialism and was excommunicated for disobedience in 1887, “never recanted” his socialist views, proving that the Catholic Church either never condemned socialism or changed its teachings on private property.   According to the New York Times and a large number of other newspapers, however, Fr. McGlynn recanted on January 19, 1894.  And on to other Media Mythbusters:

Thursday, March 14, 2019

The Social Justice of . . . Adam Smith???


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, human beings are by nature what Aristotle called “political animals.”  That is, each human being is an individual who by nature associates with other individuals within a structured social context or environment, and it is within that environment that people ordinarily acquire and develop virtue.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

A New Vision for Ireland?


On April 24, 2016 Economic Justice Media, an imprint of the interfaith think tank, the Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ), published Easter Witness: From Broken Dream to a New Vision for Ireland.  There were many good books published about the Easter Rising during the centenary year, all of them well worth reading, so this volume from a small publisher got overlooked.

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

The Three Hands of Law


Every once in a while a Faithful Reader gives us an idea for a blog posting or two, which tends to make our life a little easier as it saves us from having to think up something on our own.  This posting on “the Three Hands of the Law” is one such, so we have to “hand” someone else the credit . . . get it?  (We’re assuming the Faithful Reader will . . . and not throw anything too heavy. . . .)

Monday, March 11, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast No. 49


This week we have the second half of an interview with renowned binary economist and author Dr. Robert H.A. Ashford.  Dr. Ashford teaches law and binary economics at the University of Syracuse law school, and is the co-author of Binary Economics: The New Paradigm (Lanham, Maryland: The University Press of America, 1999):

Friday, March 8, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 10


Be prepared for a large leap in the Dow today, probably ’way up, but it could also plunge.  No, that’s not satire, unfortunately.  It’s just the way the Wall Street gambling casino operates.  “Recession signs are increasing” say the pundits, so gamblers might start bidding up prices in order to sell short (most likely) in a later adjustment, or may lock in profits now from having gone long earlier.  The latter is less likely, because the recent decline would decrease profits and a sell-off would drive prices down even more.  If you want to outguess the market, however, just flip a coin . . . or start working on implementing the Just Third Way:

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Bringing McGlynn to Heel


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the agrarian socialist Henry George and the renegade priest Father Edward McGlynn took the opportunity offered by the issuance of Rerum Novarum in 1891 as the perfect chance to get back into the public eye.  Simply by claiming that they were again being persecuted by the Catholic Church, the pair was able to tap into the anti-Catholicism always bubbling under the surface of American life.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

A Just Third Way to Finance Green Infrastructure


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, there is a problem with having government pay for infrastructure . . . especially when we expect government to pay for everything else!  Of course, what is really at issue is that “the government” doesn’t actually pay for anything.  Either it collects taxes or borrows money . . . which it is supposed to repay by collecting taxes.

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Further Adventures of George and McGlynn


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, with the sudden eclipse of the agrarian socialist Henry George and the renegade priest Father Edward McGlynn, there was no longer any need for Pope Leo XIII to issue an encyclical exclusively on “the Land Question,” i.e., whether private ownership of land is legitimate according to natural law and Catholic teaching.  It was, moreover, obvious that previous attempts by Leo XIII and previous popes to counter the dangers of socialism, modernism, and the New Age had been ineffective.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast


This week we have a special treat in store on the Just Third Way podcast: the first part of an interview with renowned binary economist and author Dr. Robert H.A. Ashford.  Dr. Ashford teaches law and binary economics at the University of Syracuse law school, and is the co-author of Binary Economics: The New Paradigm (Lanham, Maryland: The University Press of America, 1999):

Friday, March 1, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 09


Things are still moving forward on the communications front, with a number of projects coming nearer to fruition.  The video short is almost ready, and some “book trailers” are being test marketed — and we’ve even gotten one prospective volunteer as a result of viewing one of the pilot videos already!  In other news:

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Are Socialism and Social Teaching the Same?


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the agrarian socialist Henry George and the renegade priest Edward McGlynn seem to have provided the original motive for a new encyclical on the subject of socialism and why what was originally known as “the Democratic Religion,” “The New Christianity,” “Neo-Catholicism,” and many other names was not a very good thing for anyone, especially the downtrodden workers socialism was presumably intended to help.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Financing Change


One of the most frequently heard questions about the proposed “Green New Deal” is where ire they going to get the long green to pay for it?  For those of you not familiar with 1890s slang, “long green” refers to paper currency — appropriate, since it was in 1893 that the populist leader Jacob Sechler Coxey, a theosophist, proposed measures that many consider the precursor of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, a rip-off of Theodore Roosevelt’s Square Deal from 1910.

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Not the First Social Encyclical


Many people today assume that Pope Leo XIII’s groundbreaking 1891 encyclical Rerum Novarum, “On Capital and Labor,” was the first social encyclical, and that the pope was addressing matters that had recently come to his attention.  On looking into it, however, it becomes evident that Rerum Novarum — Latin for “new things” — was not the first social encyclical, and the “new things” to which Leo referred had been a serious problem for at least three quarters of a century before Rerum Novarum was issued.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Just Third Way Videocast


Just to follow up on the previous two weeks’ podcasts outlining Louis Kelso’s “Second Income Plan,” we thought we’d bring to you the 60 Minutes segment on Kelso.  Of course, it’s not actually sixty minutes long, more like thirteen and change, but that’s enough to give you the idea:

Friday, February 22, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 08


Some interesting developments this week as world leaders and academics continue to flail and flounder around trying to find the solution that has been staring them in the face for 2,500 years.  If you want a stable and virtuous society, as Aristotle pointed out in the first book of his Politics, you had better have widespread capital ownership.  Otherwise, what you get is —

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Fulton Sheen and the Problem of Finance


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the problem with the solution to social problems that Fulton Sheen advocated is that it causes another problem . . . such as, where does anyone get the money to purchase capital to become an owner without violating someone else’s ownership?  We cannot make society a free-for-all in which people take what they want when they want it.  All that means is “might makes right,” especially in economics and finance.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Fulton Sheen and the Solution


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, Fulton Sheen strongly supported the idea that the only way to counter both communism (and socialism) and capitalism is to have a society in which capital ownership is widespread.  As he stated, “Because the ownership of external things is the sign of freedom, the Church has made the wide distribution of private property the cornerstone of her social program.”  (Fulton J. Sheen, Freedom Under God.  Arlington, Virginia: Economic Justice Media, 2013, 33.)

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

New Things, Part II


In the previous posting on this subject, we noted that the “new things” (rerum novarum) to which Pope Leo XIII referred in his landmark 1891 encyclical, “On Capital and Labor,” had first been addressed in 1832 and 1834 by Pope Gregory XVI in the first two social encyclicals, Mirari Vos and Singulari Nos, both of which were concerned with problems with the theology, philosophy, and social thought of a French priest by the name of Hugues-Félicité Robert de Lamennais.

Monday, February 18, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast


This week we have the second part of a discussion on Louis Kelso’s “Second Income Plan” from the 1960s.  As with last week, there may need to be some allowances made for terms now out of common use.  Of course, the real issue is that as technology has advanced by leaps and bounds, what Kelso proposed as a second income should become people’s first income!

Friday, February 15, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 07


While world leaders ponder how to make the hole deeper that they’ve been getting the world into since governments began controlling money and credit for their own political purposes instead of the economic needs of actual people, there are a few bright spots on the horizon (if that’s not mixing metaphors or something).  They are only tiny points of light at this point, but still it’s something::

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Fulton Sheen and the Problem of Savings


In the previous posting on this subject, we noted that, according to Fulton Sheen’s understanding of the natural law right of every human being to be an owner (at least as expressed in his 1940 book, Freedom Under God), private property is an essential means to secure individual liberty.  Ultimately, private property in capital is the principal means by which people acquire and develop virtue in a social setting, thereby becoming what God intended them to be.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

New Things, Part I


While not the most immediate challenge facing people today, confusion over Catholic social teaching has, as Pope Pius XI put it, “given rise to controversies that are not always peaceful.”  If only to resolve these disputes rationally it will be useful to explore how Catholic social teaching developed.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

The American Chesterton


Back in 1940, Fulton J. Sheen published Freedom Under God.  Why bring up a book that is eighty years out of date?  Because at no time in living memory has there been less true human freedom. Even the idea of freedom has decayed to the point where it is effectively meaningless for most people.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast


This week we have the first part of a discussion on Louis Kelso’s “Second Income Plan” from the 1960s.  Of course, there may need to be some “mental adjustments” on the part of the listener as people back in the Stone(d) Age might not have spoken the way people do now (they were, like, so totally groovy and outa sight) and used terms now out of fashion.  Even worse, as technology has advanced by leaps and bounds, what Kelso proposed as a second income could easily become people’s first income!  Actually . . . that would be better, not worse. . . .

Friday, February 8, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 06


It is not quite March, but this month’s mentions are mostly media material.  That is because the CESJ core group is trying to get up to speed on all the projects we want to complete or get moved well along for the current year.  It’s just a coincidence that it all seems to deal with media, traditional, social, and otherwise:

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Ronald Reagan . . . Communist?


Unless you’ve been living in a bottle or on the top of a mountain in Tibet, you are probably aware of the massive confusion surrounding the terms “capitalism,” “socialism,” “private property,” “rights,” “duties,” “person,” etc., etc., etc.  The fact is that a lot of people are using terms when they have no idea what they really mean, and just put their own private meaning on to things.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

A Challenge to Civilization


In the opening of A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens noted that the French Revolution was a time so like his own day as to be practically indistinguishable.  Although Dickens was employing a literary device to bring the reader into the story, a similar observation could be made comparing the early twentieth century to the present time.

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

The Real Issue


Inevitably, when discussing capitalism versus socialism versus the Just Third Way, somebody will shift the basis from what is the right and just thing to do, to what is the most expedient or that gets them what they want, regardless of the cost to others.

Monday, February 4, 2019

Just Third Way Podcast


This week we have a discussion between Norman Kurland, president of CESJ, and Dawn Brohawn, CESJ’s Director of Communications:

Friday, February 1, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 05


With the country gripped in the icy grip of a gripping Polar Vortex, the Just Third Way forges on in hot pursuit of justice:

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Curing World Poverty, 1994-2019


This year marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of a publishing event: Curing World Poverty: The New Role of Property.  A “small press bestseller,” the book is even more relevant today than it was a quarter of a century ago.  (The criteria for determining bestseller status are admittedly flexible, and this was “pre-Amazon” sales, but back in the day, 3-5,000 was considered a small press bestseller, and Curing World Poverty sold over 5,000 copies without remaindering.)

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

A Democratic Socialist Responds


A few weeks ago we got a response to one of our blog postings on democratic socialism from a (gasp) democratic socialist!  Now, that in and of itself was not unusual.  What really threw us was the fact that this one was actually civil and seemed honestly to be seeking information.  Here’s what the DS said:

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Fulton Sheen and the Roots of the Problem


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the three principles of economic justice (participation, distribution, and social justice) are an essential component of a just and free society, such as Fulton Sheen reminded people in his 1940 book, Freedom Under God.

Monday, January 28, 2019

Just Third Way (Re)Broadcast


Today we have a special treat in store: a rebroadcast (we don’t do reruns) of Dr. Norman Kurland’s keynote address (ten minutes) at the “Focus on the Fed Rally” in 2010.  What with the shenanigans that have been going on with money and credit throughout the world, this message is as timely as ever:

Friday, January 25, 2019

News from the Network, Vol. 12, No. 04


Things are a little slow getting back to what people call normal after the New Year, but there are some significant Just Third Way events happening.  Of particular interest is the fact that 2019 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of CESJ’s bestselling (by small press definitions) book, Curing World Poverty: The New Role of Property.  And other happenings are equally interesting: