The Just Third Way

A Blog of the Global Justice Movement

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Sovereignty and Subsidiarity, II: The Turning Point


Yesterday we took a look at how many people view the principle of subsidiarity.  We discovered that a great many people have a great many odd ideas about something they do not appear to understand.  At the same time, they have no hesitation in speaking authoritatively on the subject.
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Monday, May 2, 2016

Sovereignty and Subsidiarity, I: The U.S. Constitution


There has been a lot of talk recently (meaning we saw one posting on FaceBook) claiming that the U.S. Constitution says nothing about “subsidiarity,” i.e., the principle that social and political issues should be dealt with at the most immediate level consistent with their resolution.  Thus, individuals should handle individual issues, local authorities deal with local issues, national authorities deal with national issues, and so on.  As CESJ co-founder Father William Ferree explained it,
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Friday, April 29, 2016

News from the Network, Vol. 9, No. 17


The Dow fell 200 or so points yesterday, and is down almost another 150 as this is being written.  This is all to the good for the gamblers, as they make money regardless which way the market goes; it’s the volatility itself that allows them to generate enormous profits.  The problem is that commercial banks, which since the repeal of Glass-Steagall and the recombination of commercial and investment banking can own equity shares other than their own, prefer to pump money into stock market speculation instead of making business loans.
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Thursday, April 28, 2016

Why a Central Bank: More Practical Considerations


This past Monday we addressed the problem of the “Automatic Gainsayer” who keeps insisting that (in our example) Country Y is so corrupt that we could never institute Just Third Way reforms, especially of the financial and tax systems.  For the sake of the argument, we demonstrated that even if the reforms turned out to be impossible from the top down — which, with the right leader, is a non-issue — it would still be possible to institute reforms from the bottom up.
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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Banksta’ Rap


Sometimes you don’t even have to think about an idea to know just how bad an idea can be . . . like doing a blog posting about the financial system titled “Banksta’ Rap,” writing it like a rap piece, and thinking it wouldn’t make us look like complete idiots.  It’s a really good idea to understand a medium — or anything else — before using it.
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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Minimum Wage Doctrine


Yes, we scheduled a final posting on central banking reform for today.  We got bogged down in other things, however, and had to set it aside until later.  Fortunately, someone asked us a question, so we just revised the answer for today’s posting.
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Monday, April 25, 2016

Why a Central Bank: Some Practical Considerations


Last week we looked at some of the basic theory of central and commercial banking in connection with examining the problem of rampant corruption in Country Y.  We discovered that the problems Country Y is having are inherent in any economy in which government controls money and credit, whether directly by issuing currency, or indirectly by emitting bills of credit and going through the central bank.  It’s a matter of degree, not of kind.
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Sunday, April 24, 2016

Easter Witness: From Broken Dream to a New Vision for Ireland


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Arlington, Virginia, Sunday, April 24, 2016. On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916 at around noon in Dublin, the capital of Ireland, a small band of men and women marched through the streets and occupied key points in the city, including the General Post Office (GPO) in the center of town. To the bafflement of onlookers, a man came out, stood in the portico of the GPO, and proclaimed that Ireland was now a republic, declaring “the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland.”
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Friday, April 22, 2016

News from the Network, Vol. 9, No. 16


Most of this week was taken up in preparing for the events or in doing the logistics of the postponement, but there have been some significant things happening:
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Thursday, April 21, 2016

Why a Central Bank: The Theoretical Solution


Yesterday we mentioned that there is always a solution, even to a mess like the banking system in Country Y, where the central bank doesn’t perform the function of a central bank (few do in any country, for that matter), and the commercial or mercantile banks can’t make loans to private sector businesses because people don’t trust private sector credit instruments (or the banks), and the currency is backed 100% with government debt.
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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Why a Central Bank: The Problem


Before we begin, we repeat that the annual Rally at the Federal Reserve and the CESJ gathering scheduled for this coming weekend, April 22-23, have been postponed due to predicted inclement weather and other factors.  All is not lost, however, as several things are in motion that may help us draw a larger crowd, and not come into conflict with various other events on the DC Mall.
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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

FED RALLY & CESJ ANNUAL GATHERING POSTPONED


 A special announcement from CESJ president Dr. Norman G. Kurland:

Due to an emergency, the annual Rally at the Fed scheduled for Friday, April 22, 2016, and the CESJ annual celebration, scheduled for Saturday, April 23, 2016, have been postponed until further notice.
It was a hard executive decision to make and there not enough time to bring together others for a meeting on the situation.  We received word late yesterday the sad news that Joyce Hart’s mother had died in India.  Joyce is flying there now.  As I mentioned to most of you over a month ago, Joyce, the producer-director of the award-winning documentary Sisters of Selma, is planning a film on Louis O. Kelso, the father of our “Just Third Way.”  Joyce wanted to interview participants at both events.
That news combined with Monday’s weather report that predicted thunderstorms for Friday forced Dawn, Rowland, Marie and me to make an emergency decision to postpone these two events for at least two months rather than have people come in from all over the country to be with us.
In the meantime, we will be approaching support from other groups seeking to unite all Americans behind the Just Third Way and its reforms to lift unjust monetary, tax and financial barriers to achieve economic democracy with workable reforms for sustainable growth that would provide equality of opportunity to every citizen to share capital ownership.
Please let members of your family and other Just Third Way supporters who were planning to be with us this week know the events have been postponed.  Michael Greaney will send out the word in his weekday Just Third Way blog.
We seek your inputs for our next events.

In solidarity,
Norm
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A Video on Money


In so many areas of knowledge, it’s not what you know that makes the difference.  It’s what you think you know.  Nowhere does this seem to be more evident than when the subject is money.  Take, for example, this article on how Iceland plans to take money creation power away from commercial banks that are controlled by the private sector, and give it to the central bank, controlled by the government.
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Monday, April 18, 2016

More Monetary Madness


If it looks as if we’re focusing a lot on money lately . . . it’s because we are.  With the annual Rally at the Federal Reserve only a few days away, it’s a good idea for people to know what money is and why we think monetary (and tax) reform are key to the implementation and maintenance of an economically just society.
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Friday, April 15, 2016

News from the Network, Vol. 9, No. 15


By coincidence, the name of William Winslow Crosskey came up a number of times this week in discussions at CESJ.  Crosskey, who taught constitutional law at the University of Chicago law school, was probably the premier constitutional scholar of the twentieth century.  Paradoxically, hardly anyone remembers him today.  Perhaps this is because his book, the two-volume (with a posthumous third) Politics and the Constitution in the History of the United States (1953) is not exactly “lite” reading, or it could be that, in common with Mortimer Adler, people are not drawn to thinkers who make them think.  There are, however, signs that things might be changing:
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