THE Global Justice Movement Website

THE Global Justice Movement Website
This is the "Global Justice Movement" (dot org) we refer to in the title of this blog.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Just Third Way Podcast No. 43


In this week’s Just Third Way podcast, host Dave Hamill finishes the discussion on the Core Values of the interfaith Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ).  Successful organizations start with people firmly committed to a set of core values, which cannot be compromised without weakening the organization.  CESJ’s strength, unity and programs flow from its founding principles, agreed upon by consensus from the first meeting on April 7, 1984. CESJ’s core values were developed to guide CESJ in its work, to attract others sharing these values and to serve as the very basis of CESJ’s existence.

Friday, November 16, 2018

News from the Network, Vol. 11, No. 46


A great deal of outreach was done this past week, with letters, telephone calls, and emails being sent to a number of possible contacts.  It is becoming increasingly clear that without the Just Third Way the world will have a difficult time turning aside from the path it is currently on and establishing a system that will give each person the chance for a more just and humane future.  With that in mind —

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Christianity versus the Democratic Religion

As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, in the early nineteenth century traditional forms of Christianity were under assault from socialism, modernism, and what became known as the New Age, with two churches especially targeted, the Church of England and the Catholic Church.  Nor is this surprising, given the fact that the Catholic Church had always been opposed to anything that undermined the natural law, and the Church of England with the Oxford Movement was making an effort to return to its original doctrinal roots.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Why NOT Capitalism?


On a fairly regular basis we get called capitalists by the socialists and socialists by the capitalists, which suggests there might be a little confusion around.  Not on our part, but on the part of others.  Last week, for example, we received the following email after someone here rejected the use of the word “capitalism”:

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Financing Made Easy(er)


Every once in a while we get a question about money, credit, banking, and finance that allows us to give a very brief refresher course on some basic principles that, nevertheless, are hard to hold in your head if you aren’t using them every day.  As our correspondent queried,

Monday, November 12, 2018

Just Third Way Podcast No. 42


In this week’s Just Third Way podcast, host Dave Hamill leads a discussion on some of the Core Values of the interfaith Center for Economic and Social Justice (CESJ).  Successful organizations start with people firmly committed to a set of core values, which cannot be compromised without weakening the organization.  CESJ’s strength, unity and programs flow from its founding principles, agreed upon by consensus from the first meeting on April 7, 1984. CESJ’s core values were developed to guide CESJ in its work, to attract others sharing these values and to serve as the very basis of CESJ’s existence.

Friday, November 9, 2018

News from the Network, Vol. 11, No. 45


We don’t need to comment on the elections this week, since they were no surprise except in a few individual cases.  Overall, the mid-terms went about as expected.  Of much more importance for the Just Third Way are the ongoing efforts at outreach, such as letters, emails, telephone calls, etc., and attendance at conferences as speakers and presenters.  It is important for people to realize that the CESJ core group cannot open their own doors — we need people with contacts to use those contacts to open doors, e.g., as was done to get the initial enabling legislation for the ESOP through, as described in “Dinner at the Madison”:

Thursday, November 8, 2018

“The Oxford Malignants”


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, just as the Oxford Movement gained what many authorities consider its greatest triumph — neutralizing the “Broad Church” (“Latitudinarian”) clergyman and Oxford professor Renn Hampden — it also set in motion a reaction that would within a few years undermine the Movement and bring it to a screeching halt, at least as far as its original purpose of reviving the Church of England was concerned.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

A Turning Point


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject, the victory of orthodoxy (more or less) in the matter of the appointment of the Reverend Renn Dickson Hampden, while the high water mark of the Oxford Movement, came at what eventually proved to be a high price.  Although the members of the Movement were not the only ones objecting to Hampden, they were the only ones singled out as having “persecuted” him.

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Misinterpreting Utopia


The other day someone referred to the Just Third Way as “utopian.”   It was one of those occasions when you realize that some people might not know exactly what they are talking about.  Quite a large number of people seem to think that a utopian scheme is one for an ideal society.  Not quite.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Just Third Way Podcast No. 41


A little late, perhaps (unless you’re on the Julian Calendar and are a couple of weeks behind everyone else) but this week’s podcast is an overview of some “Halloween Horror Specials” from past years on the Just Third Way Blog.  We would tell you more about what your host Dave Hamill has selected to relate . . . but we were far too scared to preview the podcast, and so you’ll have to take your chances.  Today is Guy Fawkes Day, so we really don't know what to expect in any event. . . .:

Friday, November 2, 2018

News from the Network, Vol. 11, No. 44


Much of the activity in the Just Third Way this week involved the interesting-to-participate-in-but-not-so-interesting-to-read-about making connections, building relationships, and planning for the coming year.  CESJ’s fiscal year ended September 30, and the annual “planning phase” for the coming year usually takes place in the “lame duck” months following the end of the fiscal year and the beginning of the calendar year:

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Guidelines for Reform


As we noted in the previous posting on this subject, society is in chaos.  People are, frankly, scared to death.  They know something is wrong but can’t seem to be able to put their finger on the problem.  They know key definitions of concepts have been changed and their institutions have somehow been transformed at a fundamental level, although the powers-that-be keep insisting otherwise.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

“Like a Summer’s Cloud”


In the previous posting on this subject — John Henry Newman and what later became known as “the act of social justice” — we saw that the controversy at Oxford University in the 1830s at the height of the Oxford Movement was starting to heat up.  Although not clearly defined, the battle lines were beginning to be drawn between the more or less orthodox “High Church” Anglicans centered (more or less) around Newman, and the less or more unorthodox “Broad Church” Anglicans who started coalescing (less or more) around the Reverend Renn Dickson Hampden.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

How Things Went Wrong


As we saw in the previous posting on this subject — the claim that modern society is going to Hell — we looked into three recent books that went into the subject in some depth.  These were Rod Dreher’s The Benedict Option (2017), Anthony Esolen’s Out of the Ashes (2017), and Archbishop Chaput’s Strangers in a Strange Land (2017).  We identified what we believe to be the “cause behind the cause” of the problems on which the three authors focus.

Monday, October 29, 2018

Just Third Way Podcast No. 40


This week Host Dave Hamill relates the story of how he got interested in the Just Third Way and Capital Homesteading.  As a special bonus, he’s also trying out a new segment that he calls “Plutocracy Story of the Week.”  This first one is about former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker's interview with the New York Times about his just-released new book, Keeping at It: The Quest for Sound Money and Good Government.  Volcker says we are becoming a plutocracy . . . which comes under the heading of “everything old is new again,” meaning this is hardly “news.”

Friday, October 26, 2018

News from the Network, Vol. 11, No. 43


Fluctuations in the stock market have become so common that it’s almost not worth commenting on.  If you have publicly traded shares, you’re probably watching it like a hawk, anyway.  If you don’t, you probably don’t really care.  One thing you should care about, however, is getting the Capital Homestead Act passed as soon as possible and get things back to a more rational system:

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Counterattacking in the Culture Wars


Recently we’ve been reading a few books about the decay of culture and civilization.  We mean recent books, although the general theme and even many of the specifics have been the subject of commentators for millennia.  They all have certain elements in common:

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

A Good Way to Go Bad


In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal there was a relatively small item that, no doubt, many people missed.  On the surface, of course, there is no particular reason why anyone should pay attention to it . . . and that might be the biggest problem of all.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Distributism and Ronald Reagan, IV


Last week we made a series of postings on the Presidential Task Force on Project Economic Justice, creatively titled Distributism and Ronald Reagan I, Distributism and Ronald Reagan II, and Distributism and Ronald Reagan III.  Today we conclude the series with (what else?) “Distributism and Ronald Reagan, IV.”  Making it easy for us, the conclusion of Reagan’s speech sums up things nicely:

Monday, October 22, 2018

Just Third Way Podcast No. 39


Ƒor a slight change of pace, this week Dave Hamill interviews retired Merchant Marine Commander Robert Woodman who some years ago led the effort for a worker buyout of the Ogleby Norton line on the Great Lakes.  Some listeners may be aware that Ogleby Norton was once called the Columbia Line, and their flagship was an ore carrier named the Edmund Fitzgerald. . . .

Friday, October 19, 2018

News from the Network, Vol. 11, No. 42


The mode of this week’s media is market madness . . . with a nod toward a number of future publications hopefully soon to come down the pike.  Other than that, there have been a lot of thoughtful conversations and one meeting, as well as the usual advancement of the Just Third Way:

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Distributism and Ronald Reagan, III


Even though we have provided links to the first posting in this little series, as well as the second posting in this series (so people can read the whole story, if they are so inclined), some readers — admittedly very, very few, a statistically “zero sample” — insist on either putting words into our mouth or don’t bother to read before jumping to a (wrong) conclusion or making an assertion they pull out of . . . the blue.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Distributism and Ronald Reagan, II


In yesterday’s posting we broke the astonishing news (a mere thirty-seven years old . . . so should it be called “olds” instead of “news”?) that Ronald Reagan, fortieth president of the United States, “the Gipper” in the second greatest movie ever made (the first, of course, being The Quiet Man), and the bane of whoever needs a convenient excuse or target for bane-ing, may have been a not-so-closet distributist! — that is, if you believe columnist John Chamberlain, but he’s a Dead White European Male (DWEM™), so you can believe anything you want . . . and you probably will . . .