Friday, October 28, 2016

News from the Network, Vol. 9, No. 41


This has been another seemingly slow news week in which a great deal has been accomplished.  Contrary to the usual case with many organizations, CESJ actually gets things done in meetings, and comes up with some good ideas:
• On Wednesday the CESJ core group met with Dr. Samuel Otterstrom of Brigham Young University, currently with BYU’s Washington Seminar.  In the discussion during and after lunch, Norman Kurland presented Dr. Otterstrom with a broad overview of the Just Third Way.  In consequence, Norm was asked to be a featured speaker at one of the Friday sessions that end each week.
• CESJ has agreed with a friend in Australia to make a concerted effort to exploit personal contacts to arrange additional meetings for Norman Kurland and the CESJ core group.  A special focus, apart from the Vatican itself, is Catholic Academia.  As there are a number of Catholic colleges and universities in the DC metro area or close by, the Arlington Diocese is a good place to start.
• CESJ is exploring the possibility of a conference on a pro-life economic agenda, along the lines suggested by Supporting Life, and based on the Universal Declaration of the Sovereignty of the Human Person Under God.  Ideally, this would lead to a “bipartisan” conference bringing together people on both sides of the issue, with everyone seeing the advantages of a life-affirming economic and financial system over those of today, a rally at the Federal Reserve, and the passage of a Capital Homestead Act for the United States to follow up on the success of Abraham Lincoln’s 1862 Homestead Act, but with a form of capital that is not limited.
• CESJ’s latest book, Easter Witness: From Broken Dream to a New Vision for Ireland, is available from Amazon and Barnes and Noble, as well as by special order from many “regular” bookstores.  The book can also be ordered in bulk, which we define as ten copies or more of the same title, at a 20% discount.  A full case is twenty-six copies, and non-institutional/non-vendor purchasers get a 20% discount off the $20 cover price on wholesale lots ($416/case).  Shipping is extra.  Send enquiries to publications@cesj.org.  An additional discount may be available for institutions such as schools, clubs, and other organizations as well as retailers.
• Here’s the usual announcement about the Amazon Smile program, albeit moved to the bottom of the page so you don’t get tired of seeing it.  To participate in the Amazon Smile program for CESJ, go to https://smile.amazon.com/.  Next, sign in to your account.  (If you don’t have an account with Amazon, you can create one by clicking on the tiny little link below the “Sign in using our secure server” button.)  Once you have signed into your account, you need to select CESJ as your charity — and you have to be careful to do it exactly this way: in the space provided for “Or select your own charitable organization” type “Center for Economic and Social Justice Arlington.”  If you type anything else, you will either get no results or more than you want to sift through.  Once you’ve typed (or copied and pasted) “Center for Economic and Social Justice Arlington” into the space provided, hit “Select” — and you will be taken to the Amazon shopping site, all ready to go.
• As of this morning, we have had visitors from 48 different countries and 46 states and provinces in the United States and Canada to this blog over the past two months. Most visitors are from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. The most popular postings this past week in descending order were “Thomas Hobbes on Private Property,”  “Aristotle on Private Property,” “Popes are the Craziest People,” A Brief Discourse on Social Credit, I: What IS ‘Social Credit’?” and “Pity the Distributist.”
Those are the happenings for this week, at least those that we know about.  If you have an accomplishment that you think should be listed, send us a note about it at mgreaney [at] cesj [dot] org, and we’ll see that it gets into the next “issue.”  If you have a short (250-400 word) comment on a specific posting, please enter your comments in the blog — do not send them to us to post for you.  All comments are moderated, so we’ll see it before it goes up.
#30#

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