Friday, September 26, 2014

News from the Network, Vol. 7, No. 38

Things are starting to pick up in the Just Third Way as people come off their summer breaks and start back in on the work of civilization -- or, at least, saving civilization so its work can continue.  The events of this week may have been few in number, but they make up in significance what they lack in quantity:

* The long-delayed meeting with new CESJ Counselor Father John Trigilio and Deacon Joseph Gorini took place on Wednesday, September 24, 2014, at the Catholic Seminary in Emmitsburg, Maryland.  Some far-reaching and sound strategizing took place, and some key individuals and organizations identified for special emphasis.  The general theme of the meeting was "door opening," that is, how best to use the networks of each member of the CESJ core group in order to get to "prime movers," with His Holiness, Pope Francis, identified as the primest of prime movers in the world today, being the only world leader with a clear vision and sound principles on which to build a program of economic, political, and social reform.

* Following the meeting, a member of the core group visited long-time CESJ volunteer, Mrs. Jean Fry.  "Miss Jean" is in very good spirits, and is a constant source of inspiration and support for the Just Third Way.

* On Thursday, CESJ's Director of Research visited the Eisenhower Farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Intended as a retirement home by the 34th president of the United States, the farm was in actuality a center of activity from its purchase in 1950 to Ike's death in 1969. The tour guides were informative, and it became clear that, had the principles and programs of the Just Third Way been presented to Eisenhower, he would instantly have understood its potential to achieve and maintain his dream of lasting world peace.

* On Friday, CESJ's Director of Research was given a personal tour of the National Bank Museum in Columbia, Pennsylvania.  An actual operating commercial bank organized under the National Banking Act of 1863 (amended 1864), the institution was part of the "quasi central bank" National Bank System that operated until the establishment of the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. One of the original purposes of the Federal Reserve was to replace the inelastic, debt-backed National Bank Note reserve currency (albeit convertible into gold on demand), with an elastic, asset-backed Federal Reserve Note reserve currency (also convertible into gold on demand).  Unfortunately, the First World War intervened, and the politicians decided to finance the war on debt instead of raising taxes, which established the precedent to finance the New Deal with debt, which continued through the Second World War down to today, and the trillions of dollars of debt that, given a Capital Homestead Act, could be eliminated relatively painlessly in approximately 65 years, speaking conservatively.

• As of this morning, we have had visitors from 60 different countries and 47 states and provinces in the United States and Canada to this blog over the past two months. Most visitors are from the United States, the United Kingdom, Ecuador, Canada, and Australia,. The most popular postings this past week were “Fulton Sheen Suspended . . . Again?, I: What’s the Story?”  “Happy Capital Day!, II: The Capital Question,” “Fulton Sheen Suspended . . . Again?, III: Faith v. Reason . . . Again?” “Aristotle on Private Property,” and “Happy Capital Day!, I: The Theories of Labor.”
Those are the happenings for this week, at least those that we know about.  If you have an accomplishment that you think should be listed, send us a note about it at mgreaney [at] cesj [dot] org, and we’ll see that it gets into the next “issue.”  If you have a short (250-400 word) comment on a specific posting, please enter your comments in the blog — do not send them to us to post for you.  All comments are moderated, so we’ll see it before it goes up.
#30#

1 comment:

nail-in-the-wall said...

One more thing: CESJ’s latest “Paradigm Paper,” The Political Animal: Economic Justice and the Sovereignty of the Human Person, is now available in bulk. With the 20% discount applicable to bulk sales (i.e., ten or more copies of a single title), a full case of 50 is $400, plus shipping. Enquire at “publications [at] cesj [dot] org” for details and cost of shipping bulk/wholesale orders. Individual copies are available now on Amazon, and should be available soon on Barnes and Noble. More at, Distributists Books and Media