Friday, January 9, 2009

Letter to David M. Walker

Here is the (almost) full text of the follow-up letter we sent to David M. Walker, former Comptroller General of the United States, after our telephone conversation with him on Tuesday, January 6, 2009. You might want to send Mr. Walker a brief letter or e-mail to demonstrate support for Capital Homesteading, and to reassure him that we are, in fact, gaining a certain amount of "traction" in our efforts to present Capital Homesteading as a viable solution to the present financial and economic crisis. His mailing address is given below, while e-mails can be sent care of kbenanti [at] pgpf [dot] org.

January 7, 2009

The Hon. David M. Walker
Peter G. Peterson Foundation
712 Fifth Avenue, 48th Floor
New York, NY 10019

Dear David:

Thank you so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to discuss Capital Homesteading and the possibilities it might offer to help get the United States out from under its unsustainable debt burden.

To summarize our position: We think our proposed Capital Homestead Act offers unique systemic solutions to the catastrophic problems you so effectively have brought to the public's attention. Our solutions include tax changes that would automatically balance the budget, begin to pay down existing federal debt, and meet future entitlement promises, along with monetary reforms that would extend as a fundamental right of citizenship to every man, woman and child, ownership incomes from newly created growth capital. Capital Homesteading would also make our economy more competitive in global trade and would thus reduce our dependency on foreign lenders.

I hope your Ph.D. economist will read our book, Capital Homesteading for Every Citizen. I encourage him to contact me if he has any questions about how Capital Homesteading could expand national income maintenance policies to include capital ownership incomes for every citizen.

Your comments and suggestions were helpful, particularly those directing us to Paul Volcker. We gratefully accept the "challenge" you gave us to start gathering support from such major policy-makers as Mr. Volcker and Senator Durbin, both of whom we are now seeking meetings with through leaders in our network.

Along with my colleagues, Michael Greaney and Dawn Brohawn, I also wish to express our appreciation for the gracious assistance of your executive assistant in arranging our telephone meeting.

I look forward to the opportunity to present in more detail to you and your advisors our comprehensive economic revitalization package, when, as you said, we "get some traction."

Again, David, thank you for your time. It's the willingness of leaders like you to open up to the possibility of new ideas and new solutions, that gives this great country of ours hope for the future.

With highest regards,

Norman G. Kurland, President

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